History

How it all began...


Despite the fact that the academic study of American culture and literature in Turkey dates back to 1965, the first graduate American Studies program in Turkey was established in 1978 at Hacettepe University, with the support of Mr. John Challinor, who was, at the time, the US Cultural Attache in Ankara.  The first undergraduate American Studies program in Turkey was eventually realized at Hacettepe in 1982, when a new department--American Culture and Literature--was created within the Division of Western Languages and Literatures with the purpose of studying the history, culture and literature of the USA.

The department graduated its first group of students in 1986. Since then, a large number of researchers and lecturers have joined the Department of American Culture and Literature, which has been offering a broad range of courses on American Literature, history, philosophy, religion, art, politics, culture and social life since its inception.

Our courses analyze American literary and cultural traditions, how they were established, and how they have changed over time, from a multicultural perspective. All courses are supplemented by interactive audio-visual aids such as videos, slides and/or music, and often include the collaboration of visiting lecturers from abroad.

Our graduates find employment as instructors of English, lecturers at university prep schools, translators in the public and private sectors, and as civil servants.  Our graduates also find employment in the tourism and finance sectors, advertising agencies, the mass media, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Interior, as well as in international agencies such as the UN, WHO, NATO and the EU.  Many also choose to pursue graduate education with the intention of becoming university professors.

All courses are taught in English, and all students admitted into the department are required to take a university-administered proficiency test in English.

Currently, there are twelve MA and six PhD students taking courses in our graduate program; twenty are writing their MA theses and PhD dissertations on various aspects of American culture and literature.